Garifuna American JOSE FRANCISCO AVILA Essay on Intellectual Property and Copyrights

Garifuna American JOSE FRANCISCO AVILA

Photo by Teofilo Colon Jr.  (a.k.a. “Tio Teo” or “Teofilo Campeon”) All Rights Reserved.

Copyright 2012 by Teofilo Colon Jr.  (a.k.a. “Tio Teo” or “Teofilo Campeon”)  and Jose Francisco Avila.  All Rights Reserved.

Bronx, New York — Below, readers of Beinggarifuna.com will find a provocative essay by Garifuna American Jose Francisco Avila on Intellectual Property.  Mr. Avila is the Chairman of the Board of Directors of The Garifuna Coalition USA Inc.  The focus of the essay on is copyrights in general and publishing in the music industry.

In the essay, Mr. Avila goes on to examine the practice by Garinagu of not registering copyrights and puts it into cultural context.  He mentions what can potentially happen when copyrights are not registered and in one devastating example, details a case of a popular Garifuna song which evolved into a controversial instance of central american music industry theft in the early 1990s.

Mr. Avila also mentions The Second Garifuna Music Symposium, which the Garifuna Coalition Sponsored in 2011.  That Garifuna Music Symposium was a Workshop on Music Business Publishing by Musician and Music Business Professor Gary Fritz.  In that workshop, Mr. Fritz detailed all aspects of music publishing, from the forms you use to register music copyrights, to explaining how to become a music publisher to even posting ASCAP publishing/royalty statements to the assembled audience.  It was truly a firm attempt to empower the Garifuna Musical Community.

Garifuna Music Business:  Ichahówarügüti versus Intellectual Property    — by Jose Francisco Avila

Click on the underlined text to read the source material.
 -
Over the past few weeks, I have been researching the topic of intellectual property and wondered why Garinagu authors do not protect their intellectual creations. In my 1992 article “Punta Goes Global”, I stated “Unfortunately very few of our cultural material have been properly documented to allow legal registration of such works.” Therefore, I decided to inquire how much things have changed since then and was shocked to find out that nineteen years later, there are only 35 Garifuna titles registered with the U.S. Copyright Office and only twelve have been authored by Garinagu, contrast that with over 9,000 Caribbean titles!
 -
One of the reasons for this phenomenon, is the fact that the Garifuna culture has been the Garifuna oral tradition, as a result, Garifuna creative works were never protected by copyright law and became  part of the “public domain,” which refers to works, ideas, and information which are intangible to private ownership and/or which are available for use by members of the public. Just think of the many great songs like “Fiura, Huya, Malati Iisien, Yurumein” and many more that have been recorded by many groups and singers without credit to the original authors.
 -
This tradition can be explained by the following quote from Mr. E. Roy Cayetano, “Twenty-seven years ago I sat in the Dangriga Education Office and in about twenty minutes or so wrote a poem entitled “Drums of My Fathers“. Even if I say so myself, that poem is one of the better-known Belizean poems. However, I will not claim credit for it because it was too easy to write. I did not figure it out. Ichahówarügüti keisi libeágei weremun wagía Garinagu. There is the phenomenon we call Ichahówarügüti which, in translation, means “just given”. This is a high level of inspiration that is acknowledged by traditional Garifuna composers who will always speak of having learnt a song instead of having composed it. It is like the spirit is giving you the song and all you have to do is to learn and remember it or, as in my case with “Drums of my Fathers”, all I had to do was write it.”
 -
With all due respect to my dear brother Roy and the Garifuna traditions, the new generation should not continue to practice this belief, in the era of the “World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO)”, one of the 17 specialized agencies of the United Nations, which  was created in 1967 “to encourage creative activity, to promote the protection of intellectual property throughout the world”. Intellectual property (IP) is a term referring to a number of distinct types of creations of the mind for which a set of exclusive rights are recognized—and the corresponding fields of law. Under intellectual property law, owners are granted certain exclusive rights to a variety of intangible assets, such as musical, literary, and artistic works; discoveries and inventions; and words, phrases, symbols, and designs. Common types of intellectual property rights include copyrights.
 -
The now famous “Conch Soup” controversy, which was the subject of my 1992 article, should serve as precedent. As is known, Banda Blanca copied the song, translated it into Spanish “sopa de caracol“, internationalized it and went on to sell over 3 million copies of the song originally written by Garifuna artist Chico Ramos. To add insult to injury, on October, 1, 1990, Banda Blanca’s leader Juan Pompilo “Pilo” Tejeda Duarte, filed a copyright registration as the author of the words and music to the song. It was not until after the controversy exploded, that he filed a registration supplement on July 8, 1991,  stating Spanish words & music: Juan Pompilo Tejeda Duarte a.k.a. Pilo Tejeda; Garifuna words & music: Hernan Chico Ramos. It also stated that the original song was in the Garifuna language. Talk about the originators rarely enjoying the fame and fortune of the imitators!
 -
In order to prevent a repetition of this sad chapter in the Garifuna Music industry, the Garifuna Coalition USA, Inc. sponsored two music symposia in 2011, including a workshop entitled “The Business Of Music: Music Copyrights and Music Publishing,” presented by Music Business Professor GARY FRITZ.  Despite this effort, not one single copyright has been registered with the U.S. Copyright Office by the New York City Garifuna Creative Community. Is this an indication that even in the “Cultural Capital of The World”, the new generation continues to believe the Ichahówarügüti over the exclusive rights granted by a copyright?
 -
A copyright is a form of intellectual property law, which protects original works of authorship including literary, dramatic, musical, and artistic works, such as poetry, novels, movies, songs, computer software, and architecture. Copyright is a form of protection granted by law for original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression. Copyright covers both published and unpublished works.
 -
Copyright registration is recommended for a number of reasons. Many choose to register their works because they wish to have the facts of their copyright on the public record and have a certificate of registration. Registered works may be eligible for statutory damages and attorney’s fees in successful litigation. Finally, if registration occurs within 5 years of publication, it is considered prima facie evidence in a court of law. Some individuals promote the practice of sending a copy of your own work to yourself, which is called a “poor man’s copyright.” However, according to the U.S. Copyright Office, there is no provision in the copyright law regarding any such type of protection, and it is not a substitute for registration.
 -
Therefore, it is time for the Garifuna creative community, specially the new generation to stop practicing the tradition of “Ichahówarügüti” and start registering copyrights for their original works of authorship. As the “Conch Soup” controversy demonstrated nineteen years ago, the originators rarely enjoy the fame and fortune of the imitators, unless they take care of their business and as professor Fritz emphasized during the workshop, “If you don’t take care of your business, your business will not take care of you!”
 -
————————————————–
 -
Please like and share this article with anyone who may be interested in it.
 -
Stay tuned to Beinggarifuna.com for more Garifuna News as it develops.
 -
-Teofilo Colon Jr.
 -
——————————————————————————

Garifuna Americano José Francisco Ávila Ensayo sobre Propiedad Intelectual y Derechos de Autor

Garifuna Americano JOSE FRANCISCO AVILA

Foto de Teofilo Colon Jr. (también conocido como “Tío Teo” o “Teófilo Campeon”) Todos los derechos reservados.

Derechos de autor 2012 por Teófilo Colón Jr. (también conocido como “Tío Teo” o “Teófilo Campeon”) y José Francisco Ávila. Todos los derechos reservados.

Bronx, Nueva York – A continuación, los lectores de Beinggarifuna.com encontrará un ensayo de provocación por Garifuna José Francisco Ávila sobre la propiedad intelectual. El señor Ávila es el Presidente de la Junta de Directores de la Coalición Garifuna Inc. EE.UU. El objetivo del ensayo sobre los derechos de autor es, en general, y la publicación en la industria de la música.

En el ensayo, el Sr. Ávila va a examinar la práctica de los garífunas de no registrar los derechos de autor y la pone en el contexto cultural. Menciona lo que potencialmente puede ocurrir cuando los derechos de autor no está registrado y en un ejemplo devastador, los detalles de un caso de una canción Garifuna populares que se convirtió en una instancia de polémica en el centro de robo americano industria de la música en la década de 1990.

 

El Sr. Ávila también menciona el simposio de música garífuna En segundo lugar, que la Coalición Garifuna patrocinados en 2011. Que la música garífuna Simposio fue un taller sobre publicación de la industria musical por el músico y profesor de la industria musical Gary Fritz. En ese seminario, el Sr. Fritz detallada todos los aspectos de la edición musical, de las formas que se utiliza para registrar los derechos de autor de música, a la explicación de cómo convertirse en un editor de música de ASCAP incluso publicar editoriales / regalías declaraciones a la audiencia reunida. Realmente fue un intento de la empresa para capacitar a la Comunidad Garífuna Musical.

 

Negocio de la música garífuna: Ichahówarügüti contra la Propiedad Intelectual – por José Francisco Ávila

-

Haga clic en el texto subrayado para leer la fuente.
 -
Durante las últimas semanas, he estado investigando el tema de la propiedad intelectual y me pregunte ¿ por qué los autores Garífunas no protegen sus creaciones intelectuales? En mi artículo de 1992 “La Punta se Globaliza“, comente “lamentablemente muy pocos de nuestros materiales culturales han sido debidamente documentados para permitir el registro legal de dichas obras.” Por lo tanto, decidí investigar cuánto han cambiado las cosas desde entonces y me sorprendió el descubrir que diecinueve años después, sólo hay 35 títulos Garifunas, registrados con el Registro de Derechos de Autor de los Estados Unidos y sólo doce han sido creados por Garífunas, contrástese con más de 9.000 títulos caribeños!
 -
Una de las razones de este fenómeno, ha sido la tradición oral Garífuna, como resultado, las obras creativas Garífunas nunca fueron protegidas por las  leyes de Derechos de Autor y se convirtieron  en parte del “Dominio Público”, que se refiere a obras, ideas e información que son intangibles a la propiedad privada y que están disponibles para su uso por el público.Sólo hay que pensar en las muchas canciones tradicionales como “Fiura, Huya, Malati Iisien, Yurumein” y muchas más que han sido grabadas por muchos grupos y cantantes sin dar crédito a los autores originales.
 -
Esta tradición puede explicarse por la siguiente cita del Sr. E. Roy Cayetano, “Hace veintisiete años me senté en la Oficina de Educación de Dangriga y en unos veinte minutos más o menos escribí un poema titulado “Los Tambores de mis padres“. Incluso aunque  lo digo yo, este poema es uno de los poemas beliceños más conocidos. Sin embargo, no puedo reclamar crédito porque fue demasiado fácil de escribir. Yo no lo compuse. Ichahówarügüti keisi libeágei weremun wagía Garífuna. Existe el fenómeno que llamamos Ichahówarügüti, cuya traducción, significa “dar”. Se trata de un alto nivel de inspiración que es reconocido por compositores de Garífuna tradicionales que siempre hablan de haber aprendido una canción en lugar de haberla compuesto. Es como si el espíritu te está dando la canción y todo lo que tienes que hacer es aprender y recordarla o, como en mi caso con “Los Tambores de mis padres”, todo lo que tuve que hacer fue escribirla.”
 -
Con todo respeto a mi querido hermano Roy y las tradiciones Garífunas, la nueva generación no debe seguir la práctica de esta creencia, en la era de la ” ” Organización Mundial de la Propiedad Intelectual (OMPI) “, uno de los 17 organismos especializados de las Naciones Unidas, que fue creado en 1967″ para estimular la actividad creadora”, para promover la protección de la propiedad intelectual en todo el mundo.. Propiedad intelectual (IP) es un término que se refiere a un número de distintos tipos de creaciones de la mente para las que se reconocen un conjunto de derechos exclusivos y los campos correspondientes de la ley.En virtud del derecho de propiedad intelectual, a los propietarios se conceden ciertos derechos exclusivos a una variedad de activos intangibles, como musicales, literarias y obras artísticas; descubrimientos e invenciones; y palabras, frases, símbolos y diseños. Tipos más comunes de los derechos de propiedad intelectual incluyen el derecho de autor.
 -
La controversia por la famosa canción “Sopa de Caracol“, que fue el tema de mi artículo de 1992, debe servir como precedente. Como es sabido, la Banda Blanca copio la canción, traduciéndola  al español, la internacionalizo y llegó a vender más de 3 millones de copias de la canción escrita por el artista Garifuna Chico Ramos. Para añadir insulto a la injuria, el 01 de octubre de 1990, el líder de la de Banda Blanca Juan Pompilo “Pilo” Tejeda Duarte, presentó un registro de derecho de autor como el autor de la letra y la música de la canción. No fue hasta después de que estalló la controversia, que presentó un suplemento de registro el 08 de julio de 1991, indicando letras en español y música: Juan Pompilo Tejeda Duarte alias Pilo Tejeda; Letra y Música Garifuna: Hernán Chico Ramos. También afirmó que la canción original fue en la lengua Garífuna. Prueba que los autores rara vez disfrutan de la fama y la fortuna de los imitadores!
 -
A fin de impedir una repetición de este triste capítulo de la industria de la música Garifuna, la Coalición Garifuna USA, Inc. patrocino dos simposios de música en el 2011, incluyendo un taller titulado “El negocio de la música: derechos de autor de música y edición musical ,”presentado por el profesor de negocios de música GARY FRITZ. A pesar de este esfuerzo, ni un solo derecho de autor ha sido registrado con el Registro de Derechos de Autor de los Estados Unidos por la comunidad creativa Garifuna de Nueva York. ¿Será  un indicio de que incluso en la “Capital Cultural del Mundo”, la nueva generación sigue creyendo el Ichahówarügüti sobre los derechos exclusivos concedidos por un derecho de autor?
 -
El derecho de autor es un decreto de ley de propiedad intelectual, que protege las obras originales de autoría incluyendo obras literarias, dramáticas, musicales y artísticas, tales como poesía, novelas, películas, canciones, programas informáticos y arquitectura. Los Derechos de autor son una forma de protección conferida por la ley de obras originales de autoría fijada en un medio tangible de expresión. Abarca trabajos publicados y no publicados.
 -
Es recomendable el Registro de los derechos de autor por una serie de razones. Muchos optan por registrar sus trabajos porque desean tener los hechos de sus derechos de autor en el registro público y tener un certificado de inscripción. Las obras registradas pueden ser elegibles para daños legales y honorarios de abogados en litigios exitosos. Por último, si el registro se produce dentro de 5 años de la  publicación, se considera evidencia primordial en un Tribunal de Justicia. Algunos individuos promueven la práctica de enviar una copia de su propio trabajo a sí mismo, que se llama un “Derecho de Autor del Pobre”. Sin embargo, según el Registro de Derechos de Autor de los Estados Unidos, dicha práctica de protección no está prevista en la ley de derecho de autor, y no es un sustituto para el registro.
 -
Por lo tanto, es hora que la comunidad creativa Garifuna, especialmente la nueva generación deje de practicar la tradición del “Ichahówarügüti “y empezar a registrar los derechos de autor de sus obras originales de autoría. Como lo demostró la controversia por la ” Sopa de caracol ” hace diecinueve años los autores rara vez disfrutan la fama y la fortuna de los imitadores, a menos que protejan su negocio y como destacó el profesor Fritz durante el taller “¡Si usted no protege de su negocio, su negocio no lo protegerá a usted!”

-

—————–

-
Por favor, gusta y compartir este artículo con cualquier persona que pueda estar interesado en él.
-
Manténgase en sintonía con Beinggarifuna.com de Noticias Garifuna más a medida que se desarrolla.
-
-Teófilo Colon Jr.
-
————————–